Christy Flanagan-Feddon

Christy Flanagan-Feddon, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. from Florida State University (2009)
  • M.A. from Florida State University (2002)
  • B.A. from DePaul University (2000)

Research Interests

Feuerbach, Philosophy of Religion, Religion and Culture, 19th-20th Century Continental Philosophy, Christian Tradition, Ethics, Theory and Method in the Study of Religion

Recent Research Activities

Dr. Flanagan-Feddon is particularly interested in discussions of rationality and aesthetic consciousness after the Enlightenment, especially with reference to religious epistemology, subjectivity and identity. 


Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • Flanagan-Feddon, Christy. “To ‘let religion itself speak:’ Feuerbach and Religious Consciousness in Modern Culture." Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory 14.2 (2015): 338-349.

Book Sections/Chapters

  • Flanagan, Christy. “Death of God Theology.” Encyclopedia of Religion in America, Vol. I, ed. Charles H.Lippy and Peter W. Williams, (Washington, D.C.: CQ Press, 2010), 521-526.

Conference Papers/Presentations

  • “When Reason Goes Rogue: Considering the Possibilities of Holding Beliefs Without Evidence,” Invited presentation by the University of South Florida Department of Humanities and Cultural Studies, 2017.
  • “Feuerbachian Contributions to the ‘Pragmatic Turn’ in the Study of Religion,”  Paper presented at the University of Central Florida Faculty Colloquium Series, 2014.
  •  “Revisiting Feuerbach: Nature as Epistemological Horizon,” Paper presented at South Carolina Society for Philosophy Annual Meeting, 2014.
  • “The Phenomenal God: The Luther-Feuerbach Relation,” Paper presented at the American Academy of Religion, Southeast Meeting, 2007.

  • “Feuerbach’s Religious Subjectivity: A Paradigm of Reciprocity,” Paper presented at the Florida State University Graduate Student Symposium, 2007.

  • “Levinas and the One: The (Non-)Ontological Shift,” Paper presented at the American Academy of Religion, Southeast Meeting, 2006.

  • “Subjectivity and Alterity in Augustine’s City of God,”  Paper presented at the American Academy of Religion, Southeast Meeting, 2005.

  • “Sex, Religion, and Alienation: A Critique of Irigaray’s Use of Feuerbach’s Projection Theory,” Paper presented at the American Academy of Religion, Midwest Meeting, 2003.

  • “The Last Temptation of Christ: A Postmodern Image,” Paper presented at the Florida State University Graduate Student Symposium, 2002.

Miscellaneous Publications

  • Flanagan-Feddon, Christy. (2016, December 19). On Idols and Idolatry: Feuerbach, Trump, and Female Self-Identity [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://philosophygoestochurch.wordpress.com/

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11493 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web - Unavailable
No Description Available
10001 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face M,W,F 11:30AM - 12:20PM Unavailable
No Description Available
19084 PHI3720 Faith and Reason Web - Unavailable
No Description Available
11436 REL3111 Religion and Phil Through Film Web - Unavailable
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81665 PHH3510 Marx and Nietzsche Web - Available

This course will consider the cultural, intellectual, and historical impact of the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Nietzsche.  We will first look at the genesis of their work in Hegel, move to an analysis of their primary texts and finally consider the trajectories of their thought in more recent figures and trends.  We will consider their significant influence in the areas of philosophy, religion, self-identity, hegemony, cultural criticism, economics, and politics. Because of the reading- and writing-intensive nature of the course, prior coursework in philosophy is assumed.

81605 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web - Available

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of philosophy from a historical perspective.  Beginning with its ancient roots and continuing into contemporary thought, we will consider such questions as the nature of being, existence, human selfhood, morality, justice, religion, and the metaphysical foundations of knowledge.  The course is designed to enable students to think more constructively about themselves and their place in the world and also to enrich their awareness of philosophy as an integral thread in the fabric of the liberal arts.

81612 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web - Available

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of philosophy from a historical perspective.  Beginning with its ancient roots and continuing into contemporary thought, we will consider such questions as the nature of being, existence, human selfhood, morality, justice, religion, and the metaphysical foundations of knowledge.  The course is designed to enable students to think more constructively about themselves and their place in the world and also to enrich their awareness of philosophy as an integral thread in the fabric of the liberal arts.

81604 REL3403 Christianity Web - Available

In this course we explore the Christian tradition from an academic perspective. We will look at the origins of early Christianity and the historical figure of Jesus of Nazareth, the role of the Bible, the development of church orthodoxy, major movements in Christian history, differences between denominations, and the interplay of rituals, culture, and self-identity. Ultimately we will consider the breadth of Christianity both in term of its official tenets and its reality as a living, evolving tradition. This course assumes no prior knowledge or participation in Christianity as a religious tradition.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50892 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web A - Available
No Description Available
50842 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web B - Available
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
18864 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web - Available

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of philosophy from a historical perspective.  Beginning with its ancient roots and continuing into contemporary thought, we will consider such questions as the nature of being, existence, human selfhood, morality, justice, religion, and the metaphysical foundations of knowledge.  The course is designed to enable students to think more constructively about themselves and their place in the world and also to enrich their awareness of philosophy as an integral thread in the fabric of the liberal arts. 

21008 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web - Available

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of philosophy from a historical perspective.  Beginning with its ancient roots and continuing into contemporary thought, we will consider such questions as the nature of being, existence, human selfhood, morality, justice, religion, and the metaphysical foundations of knowledge.  The course is designed to enable students to think more constructively about themselves and their place in the world and also to enrich their awareness of philosophy as an integral thread in the fabric of the liberal arts. 

18863 PHI3750 The Problem of Evil Web - Available

The problem of evil poses a significant problem to the philosophical and theological traditions of the West.  Is it possible to believe the world is rational, redemptive and good even when atrocious actions take place?  How do we understand such a world when these acts of evil occur? In our exposition of this issue we will consider the ideas of omnipotence, atheism, determinism, free will, theodicy, pantheism, and radical freedom.

11649 REL3111 Religion and Phil Through Film Web - Available

In this course we use film as a medium to explore different concepts in philosophy and religion. We will consider issues related to metaphysics, ethics, temporality, the “death of God,” feminism, the portrayal of religion in culture, the understanding of religious traditions through practice, and the representation of religion.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
90989 PHH3510 Marx and Nietzsche Web - Available

This course will consider the cultural, intellectual, and historical impact of the work of Karl Marx and Friedrich Nietzsche.  We will first look at the genesis of their work in Hegel, move to an analysis of their primary texts and finally consider the trajectories of their thought in more recent figures and trends.  We will consider their significant influence in the areas of philosophy, religion, self-identity, hegemony, cultural criticism, economics, and politics. This course assumes prior coursework in philosophy.

81699 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web - Available

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of philosophy from a historical perspective.  Beginning with its ancient roots and continuing into contemporary thought, we will consider such questions as the nature of being, existence, human selfhood, morality, justice, religion, and the metaphysical foundations of knowledge.  The course is designed to enable students to think more constructively about themselves and their place in the world and also to enrich their awareness of philosophy as an integral thread in the fabric of the liberal arts. 

81744 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web - Available

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts of philosophy from a historical perspective.  Beginning with its ancient roots and continuing into contemporary thought, we will consider such questions as the nature of being, existence, human selfhood, morality, justice, religion, and the metaphysical foundations of knowledge.  The course is designed to enable students to think more constructively about themselves and their place in the world and also to enrich their awareness of philosophy as an integral thread in the fabric of the liberal arts. 

80305 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face M,W,F 10:30AM - 11:20AM Available

This course will introduce students to the fundamental concepts of philosophy from a historical perspective.  Beginning with its ancient roots and continuing into contemporary thought, we will consider such questions as the nature of being, existence, human selfhood, morality, justice, religion, and the metaphysical foundations of knowledge.  In addition to deepening their awareness of philosophy as an integral thread in the fabric of the liberal arts, the course is also designed to compel students to think more constructively about their place in the world and consider how philosophical concepts can be utilized in response to challenges of modern-day society.

Updated: Aug 17, 2018