Philosophy Department

Sabatino DiBernardo

Sabatino DiBernardo, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Religion from Syracuse University (2000)
  • M.Phil. in Religion from Syracuse University (1998)
  • M.A. in Theology from St. Bernard's Institute (1994)
  • B.A. in Religious Studies from St. John Fisher College (1992)

Research Interests

  • Pyrrhonian Skepticism
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Deconstruction
  • Philosophy, Religion and Popular Culture

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • “Walker Bite: Differentiating the Dead” in The Ultimate Walking Dead and Philosophy: Hungry for More, ed. Wayne Yeun. Popular Culture and Philosophy Series, ed. George A. Reisch (Chicago: Open Court, 2016)


Book Sections/Chapters

  • Forthcoming “Rock ‘n’ Religion: Dis/Harmony of the Spheres” in Saints, Sinners, and Seekers, edited by Alex DiBlasi and Robert McParland (MacFarland Publishing)


  • “God, Flag, and Country: Ironic Variations on a Metaphysical Theme” in This is the Sound of Irony: Music, Politics and the Public Sphere, ed. Kathleen Turner (Burlington: Ashgate Publishing, 2015)


  • “Reading the Signs” in The Ultimate Walking Dead and Philosophy: Hungry for More, ed. Wayne Yeun. Popular Culture and Philosophy Series, ed. George A. Reisch (Chicago: Open Court, 2016)


  • “Heavy Metal’s Ironic Edge: Distortion, Demonization, and Noise Control” in Music at the Extremes: Essays on Sounds Outside the Mainstream, ed. Scott Wilson (Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland, 2015)


  • “Critias” in The Sophists: An Introduction,” ed. Patricia O’Grady (London: Duckworth Press, 2008)


  • “Sextus Empiricus” in Meet the Philosophers: Everything you always wanted to know about Ancient Greek philosophy but didn’t know who to ask, ed. Patricia O’Grady(Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005)


Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19086 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
11122 REL3101 Religion in Popular Culture Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
11123 REL4910 Senior Research Seminar Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81521 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
93169 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
81218 PHI3700 Philosophy of Religion Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50539 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web B Web Available

This course is an introduction to variously constructed life philosophies, notions of the “good life,” and questions of truth, reality, belief, meaning, and value in premodern, modern, and postmodern philosophical contexts.  In addition to engaging students in critical thinking about philosophical questions, this course will introduce students to different religious philosophies as developed through "Eastern" and "Western" cultural constructions of reality.  Consequently, this course will facilitate student engagement regarding matters of faith and reason mediated through different philosophical positions and modes of being in the world that have influenced contemporary culture.




50947 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web A Web Available

This course is an introduction to variously constructed life philosophies, notions of the “good life,” and questions of truth, reality, belief, meaning, and value in premodern, modern, and postmodern philosophical contexts.  In addition to engaging students in critical thinking about philosophical questions, this course will introduce students to different religious philosophies as developed through "Eastern" and "Western" cultural constructions of reality.  Consequently, this course will facilitate student engagement regarding matters of faith and reason mediated through different philosophical positions and modes of being in the world that have influenced contemporary culture.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11669 PHP3783 Modernity As Phil Problem Web Web Available

This course explores modernism and postmodernism through a close reading of primary essays representative of both philosophical positions in order to address modernity as a philosophical problem (for postmodernity).  We will analyze and assess this philosophical problem (or problems) through excerpts from readings associated with modern and postmodern philosophers and critical theorists.  In the process, students will be encouraged to read and think critically about the philosophical issues at stake, the various types of philosophies that emerged during the respective periods, and their implications for questions concerning meaning, value, truth, belief, knowledge, and language.



11185 REL3101 Religion in Popular Culture Web Web Available

This course is an exploration of the relationship between religion and popular culture. We will be thinking critically about the concept of religion as encountered in and constructed by diverse theoretical and popular culture discourses. Operating with an awareness of the different modalities of religion in our increasingly secular and postmodern culture, this course will explore the religious rhetoric and themes involved (but often unnoticed) in popular culture as well as the possibility of interpreting popular culture phenomena as functioning religiously.



11186 REL4910 Senior Research Seminar Web Web Available

This course is a senior seminar for Religion and Cultural Studies majors that will provide a theoretical space to engage critical terms, concepts, and topics in the areas of religion and cultural studies. It will provide students with key terminology and concepts from contemporary studies across a number of disciplines and will culminate with the production of a scholarly research paper in an area of interest for each student in consultation with the instructor.  Underlying this discourse will be an ongoing self-reflexive questioning: How does one theorize religion?  What role does cultural studies play in this theorizing?  What is theory and why is it needed? These questions will set the stage for important other questions:  How does culture communicate, transmit, or transform meaning and, conversely, how does meaning communicate, transmit, or transform culture?  In the process, the student will be invited to think critically about religion and cultural studies by means of various representative theoretical perspectives.



Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81906 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web Web Available

This course will introduce variously constructed life philosophies, notions of the “good life,” and questions of truth, reality, belief, meaning, and value in premodern, modern, and postmodern philosophical contexts.  In addition to engaging students in critical thinking about philosophical questions, this course will introduce students to different religious philosophies as developed through "Eastern" and "Western" cultural constructions of reality.  Consequently, this course will facilitate student engagement regarding matters of faith and reason mediated through different philosophical positions and modes of being in the world that have influenced contemporary culture.

81352 PHI3700 Philosophy of Religion Web Web Available

This course will explore the phenomenon of religion with an emphasis on issues of faith, reason, belief, knowledge, and language. We will examine various traditional philosophies of religion (e.g., the problem of evil, faith and reason, arguments for and against the existence of God, death and the immortality of the soul, etc.) as well as postmodern philosophies of religion. This course is an invitation to critical reading and thinking about the ways in which humans encounter religion and assess its significance in relation to issues of value, meaning, and identity.

81444 REL3115 Religion Spirit & Popular Musi Web Web Available

This course is an exploration of the contemporary spiritualities encountered at the intersection of religion, philosophy, and popular music.  It is an invitation to critical thinking about the religious and spiritual implications of popular music.  Operating with an awareness of the different modes of spirituality and religion in an increasingly secular and postmodern culture, we will examine the religious and spiritual import of nontraditional religio-musical "texts."

Updated: Jun 25, 2018

Philosophy Department • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-2273 Fax: 407-823-6658  • philosophy@ucf.edu