Philosophy Department

Mason Cash

Mason Cash, Ph.D.

Mason Cash is originally from Gisborne, New Zealand. He moved to Canada in 1995 to do a Ph. D. in philosophy at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton, AB. Before coming to the University of Central Florida in 2003, he taught for three years at Dalhousie University in Halifax, NS, Canada.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Philosophy from University of Alberta (2000)

Research Interests

  • Philosophy of cognitive science
  • Philosophy of mind
  • Philosophy of language
  • Ethics

Recent Research Activities

Dr. Cash's research revolves around the thesis that human beings are fundamentally members of normative communities. The core of his research program is the thesis that all entities that are held to have meaning (including utterances, actions, images, texts, and neurological representations) are constituted as meaningful by virtue of the role they play in human normative practices; in particular, the practice of ascribing intentional states as reasons for actions. He focuses on the implications of this thesis for our accounts of language, of cognition, and of what it means to be a human being.

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • Mason Cash, 2013. Cognition without borders: 'Third wave' socially distributed cognition and relational autonomy. Cognitive Systems Research. Volumes 25–26, December 2013, Pages 61–71  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogsys.2013.03.007 
  • Mason Cash 2010. Extended cognition, personal responsibility, and relational autonomy. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9: 645–671.
  • Cash, M. 2009. Normativity is the mother of intention: Wittgenstein, normative practices and neurological representations. New Ideas in Psychology 27: 133-147
  • Cash, M. 2008. The normativity problem: Evolution and naturalized semantics. The Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (1-2).
  • Cash, M. 2008. Thoughts and oughts. Philosophical Explorations 11 (2): 93-119.

Awards

Dr Cash won a UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award, for excellence in teaching in 2009 and again in 2017.

Activities

Dr. Cash teaches courses in Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Cognitive Science, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Science, Environmental Ethics, Environmental Philosophy, Metaphysics, and Ethics, among other things.

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10727 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face Tu,Th 3:00PM - 4:15PM Not Online
No Description Available
11538 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face Tu,Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM Not Online
No Description Available
10914 PHI3323 Minds & Machine: Phil Cog Sci Face2Face Tu,Th 9:00AM - 10:15AM Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
80776 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Face2Face M,W,F 10:30AM - 11:20AM Available

Philosophy courses explore different perspectives on deep and important questions. They also develop important skills, which are applicable in many areas of life.  Through active participation in this course, you will improve your skills in:

·  Understanding viewpoints different from your own

·  Clearly explaining your views to others

·  Assessing the reasons for holding your views

·  Being convincing in defending your views

This course aims to develop these philosophical skills through critically reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing about classic and contemporary philosophical issues, questions and debates.  During this course we will explore different approaches to questions such as:

·  What is a good way to live one's life? Is there a best way?

·  What would a just society be like?  Is it even possible?

·  What can we know?  What does it take to “know” something?

·  What are you?  a mind? a body?  a human being? a person?

·  What is a person? Could a non-human be one?

·  What could change about you, without changing who you are?

The aim of the course is not merely to learn about what philosophers have thought about questions like these, but to do philosophy using philosophers' approaches to such questions as starting points. 

By the end of this course, you should have your own answers to many of these questions, and should be able to explain your reasons for holding those views.

This course is an opportunity for you to think for yourself, to examine and critically assess approaches to problems, and to defend ideas and positions of your own.  The course, therefore, will require you to participate rather than simply take information in.  You will read actively, and will be expected to reflect on what you read. You will also be given many opportunities to discuss with others, both verbally and in writing, your thoughts about the readings, questions and issues we cover.

81864 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face M,W,F 12:30PM - 1:20PM Available

Philosophy courses explore different perspectives on deep and important questions. They also develop important skills, which are applicable in many areas of life.  Through active participation in this course, you will improve your skills in:

·  Understanding viewpoints different from your own

·  Clearly explaining your views to others

·  Assessing the reasons for holding your views

·  Being convincing in defending your views

This course aims to develop these philosophical skills through critically reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing about classic and contemporary philosophical issues, questions and debates.  During this course we will explore different approaches to questions such as:

·  What is a good way to live one's life? Is there a best way?

·  What would a just society be like?  Is it even possible?

·  What can we know?  What does it take to “know” something?

·  What are you?  a mind? a body?  a human being? a person?

·  What is a person? Could a non-human be one?

·  What could change about you, without changing who you are?

The aim of the course is not merely to learn about what philosophers have thought about questions like these, but to do philosophy using philosophers' approaches to such questions as starting points. 

By the end of this course, you should have your own answers to many of these questions, and should be able to explain your reasons for holding those views.

This course is an opportunity for you to think for yourself, to examine and critically assess approaches to problems, and to defend ideas and positions of your own.  The course, therefore, will require you to participate rather than simply take information in.  You will read actively, and will be expected to reflect on what you read. You will also be given many opportunities to discuss with others, both verbally and in writing, your thoughts about the readings, questions and issues we cover.

91178 PHI4221 Philosophy of Language Face2Face M,W,F 1:30PM - 2:20PM Available

This is a course that examines the nature, origins, use(s) and role(s) of language from a philosophical perspective. Students will examine both philosophical literature and empirical research that support competing views of the relationships between language, reality, cognition and culture.

This interdisciplinary approach will incorporate a variety of learning strategies for developing your ability to assess, analyze and produce your own positions and arguments about these relationships. 

Analytical Framework

Philosophical investigation often begins with a question.  Most of the papers we read are attempts to answer one question or another about language and its relationships with cognition, culture and context.  Identifying the question asked by a particular author, and what their answer is, can be a very useful way to approach reading the kinds of papers we will read for this course.

These papers will be instrumental in helping you to come up with reasoned and defensible answers of your own, or perhaps to identify better questions.

Questions we explore may include:

·  What is a language?

·  What is language for?

·  How did language arise?

·  What distinguishes animal communication from human language?

·  What do features that distinguish human language from animal communication tell us about humanity?

·  What do human languages tell us about different aspects of humanity or different ways of being human?

·  In what ways is language related to political power?  How can it be used to create, maintain, or rebel against social or political structures?

·  How are language and culture related?

·  What does one learn when one learns a language?

·  What do we share when we share a language?

·  How does an expression get a meaning?

·  How do culture and language affect how we think and categorize?

·  Is it possible to translate from one language to another?

·  Is the meaning of the speaker’s utterance fixed by what the speaker has in mind? By the audience? By the speaker’s community?

·  Does of a speech act contribute to the meaning of the speaker’s utterance?

·  What roles do power relationships play in constructing categories of objects for words to refer to?

·  Can reality be a projection of language that changes depending on the language spoken?

·  What is the relationship between words and objects they refer to?

·  What does it take for a statement to be true?

·  How does the judgment of a statement to be true relate to issues of political power and social control?

91179 PHI5225 Philosophy of Language Face2Face M,W,F 1:30PM - 2:20PM Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50939 PHI2108 Critical Thinking Web B Web Available

This is a course in intellectual self-defense. Through active participation in this course, you will improve your understanding of how arguments and other persuasive techniques are used in our society in attempts to manipulate you into thinking or behaving in particular ways. You will gain a better understanding of how such techniques are employed, and be better able to identify them and defend against them.

The course looks at critical thinking for a diverse society.  This means looking at arguments from many different perspectives.  Your perspective is important.  But you will also have the opportunity to examine and evaluate the frame of reference you bring to situations, and will have the opportunity to critically engage with other students, who have differing perspectives.

We begin by examining the structure of arguments and techniques for illuminating the relationships between the parts of an argument. We also closely examine different types of poor reasoning, learning how to identify it, and thus to “see through” attempts to use it.

We also examine the role of our worldviews and background beliefs in assessing and constructing arguments, and look at common human psychological factors that impede cogent reasoning.

In the latter part of the course, we apply what we have learned about critical thinking by studying the techniques that advertisers, political campaigns, and public relations campaigns employ to attempt to manipulate citizens’ attitudes and behavior towards products, brands, candidates for election, and issues. Having an understanding of these techniques you will be better able to think for yourselves rather than fall victim to such manipulation.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11612 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face Tu,Th 9:00AM - 10:15AM Available
No Description Available
18736 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face Tu,Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM Available
No Description Available
18294 PHI3930H Hon Special Topic Face2Face Tu,Th 3:00PM - 4:15PM Available
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
80836 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Face2Face M,W,F 10:30AM - 11:20AM Available
Philosophy courses explore different perspectives on deep and important questions. They also develop important skills, which are applicable in many areas of life.

Through active participation in this course, you will improve your skills in:
• Understanding viewpoints different from your own
• Clearly explaining your views to others
• Assessing the reasons for holding your views
• Being convincing in defending your views

This course aims to develop these philosophical skills through critically reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing about classic and contemporary philosophical issues, questions and debates.

During this course we will explore different approaches to questions such as:
• What is a good way to live one's life? Is there a best way?
• What would a just society be like? Is it even possible?
• What can we know? What does it take to “know” something?
• What is a person? Could a non-human be one?

The aim of the course is not merely to learn about what philosophers have thought about questions like these, but to do philosophy using philosophers' approaches to such questions as starting points.

By the end of this course, you should have your own answers to many of these questions, and should be able to explain your reasons for holding those views.
This course is an opportunity for you to think for yourselves, to examine and critically assess approaches to problems, and to defend ideas and positions of your own.

The course, therefore, will require you to participate rather than simply take information in. You will read actively, and will be expected to reflect on what you read. You will also be given many opportunities to discuss with others, both verbally and in writing, your thoughts about the readings, questions and issues we cover.
80312 PHI2010H Honors Intro to Philosophy Face2Face M,W,F 11:30AM - 12:20PM Available
Philosophy courses explore different perspectives on deep and important questions. They also develop important skills, which are applicable in many areas of life.

Through active participation in this course, you will improve your skills in:
• Understanding viewpoints different from your own
• Clearly explaining your views to others
• Assessing the reasons for holding your views
• Being convincing in defending your views

This course aims to develop these philosophical skills through critically reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing about classic and contemporary philosophical issues, questions and debates.

During this course we will explore different approaches to questions such as:
• What is a good way to live one's life? Is there a best way?
• What would a just society be like? Is it even possible?
• What can we know? What does it take to “know” something?
• What is a person? Could a non-human be one?

The aim of the course is not merely to learn about what philosophers have thought about questions like these, but to do philosophy using philosophers' approaches to such questions as starting points.

By the end of this course, you should have your own answers to many of these questions, and should be able to explain your reasons for holding those views.
This course is an opportunity for you to think for yourselves, to examine and critically assess approaches to problems, and to defend ideas and positions of your own.

The course, therefore, will require you to participate rather than simply take information in. You will read actively, and will be expected to reflect on what you read. You will also be given many opportunities to discuss with others, both verbally and in writing, your thoughts about the readings, questions and issues we cover.
80657 PHI3640 Environmental Ethics Face2Face M,W,F 1:30PM - 2:20PM Available
This course is a critical examination of philosophical ethics concerning conceptions of the value of the non-human natural world, exploring how they might guide an appropriate ethical response to that value.

During this course we will explore many approaches to questions such as:
• Can the appropriate ethical response be guided simply by “expanding the circle” of the subjects of ethical consideration?

• What are the appropriate bearers of value (humans only, sentient animals, subjects-of-a-life, ecosystems, the biosphere, etc.)? How inclusive should we be?

• Can traditional ethical theories (developed to regulate human interactions) be expanded to encompass human interactions with non-humans? With non-sentient life? With ecosystems? With the biosphere?

• Can the bearers of value be things other than individual entities? Can collectives (such as ecosystems or species) be appropriate targets of ethical consideration?

• Is the value of the natural world to be assessed only or primarily in terms of the value for people? Or does the non-human natural world have some kind of intrinsic value-in-and-for-itself?

• Should the appropriate ethical responses to the natural world be tempered by people’s moral psychology and the kinds of arguments and attitudes others will find persuasive?

• How ought we balance environmental values against human values and social issues (feeding people, human rights, justice, democracy)?

We will also look at several important test cases in which environmental values need to be applied but how they are to be applied causes controversies. E.g.:
• Is sustainability possible? What should “sustainability” mean?
• Can and ought we restore “natural” ecosystems?
• Should we preserve wilderness?
• Are environmentalism and human rights concerns compatible?
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50332 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Face2Face A M,Tu,W,Th 10:00AM - 11:50AM Available
Philosophy courses explore different perspectives on deep and important questions. They also develop important skills, which are applicable in many areas of life.

Through active participation in this course, you will improve your skills in:
• Understanding viewpoints different from your own
• Clearly explaining your views to others
• Assessing the reasons for holding your views
• Being convincing in defending your views

This course aims to develop these philosophical skills through critically reading, analyzing, discussing, and writing about classic and contemporary philosophical issues, questions and debates.

During this course we will explore different approaches to questions such as:
• What is a good way to live one's life? Is there a best way?
• What would a just society be like? Is it even possible?
• What can we know? What does it take to “know” something?
• What is a person? Could a non-human be one?

The aim of the course is not merely to learn about what philosophers have thought about questions like these, but to do philosophy using philosophers' approaches to such questions as starting points.

By the end of this course, you should have your own answers to many of these questions, and should be able to explain your reasons for holding those views.
This course is an opportunity for you to think for yourselves, to examine and critically assess approaches to problems, and to defend ideas and positions of your own.

The course, therefore, will require you to participate rather than simply take information in. You will read actively, and will be expected to reflect on what you read. You will also be given many opportunities to discuss with others, both verbally and in writing, your thoughts about the readings, questions and issues we cover.
50980 PHI2108 Critical Thinking Web B Web Not Online
This is a course in intellectual self-defense. Through active participation in this course, you will improve your understanding of how arguments and other persuasive techniques are used in our society in attempts to manipulate you into thinking or be-having in particular ways. You will gain a better understanding of how such techniques are employed, and be better able to identify them and defend against them.

The course looks at critical thinking for a diverse society. This means looking at ar-guments from many different perspectives. Your perspective is important. But you will also have the opportunity to examine and evaluate the frame of reference you bring to situations, and will have the opportunity to critically engage with other stu-dents, who have differing perspectives.

We begin by examining the structure of arguments and techniques for illuminating the relationships between the parts of an argument. We also closely examine different types of poor reasoning, learning how to identify it, and thus to “see through” at-tempts to use it.

We also examine the role of our worldviews and background beliefs in assessing and constructing arguments, and look at common human psychological factors that im-pede cogent reasoning.

In the latter part of the course, we apply what we have learned about critical thinking by studying the techniques that advertisers, political campaigns, and public relations campaigns employ to attempt to manipulate citizens’ attitudes and behavior towards products, brands, candidates for election, and issues. Having an understanding of these techniques you will be better able to think for yourselves rather than fall victim to such manipulation.


IMPORTANT CAUTION

This on-line course requires personal discipline and organization. The schedule of weeks and modules is designed to keep you on track. You will complete two modules each week on average (though some modules are longer and take a full week).

You NEED to use the textbook. The modules are designed to supplement the text-book. They direct you to read particular pages, and to complete practice exercises in the textbook. The textbook’s explanations are practice exercises will help you prepare for the graded quizzes, exercises and assignments.

There are many practice exercises to complete. These are not graded. You will complete them and compare your answers to the model answers to assess whether you have understood and mastered the relevant skill. While these are not graded, I assure you that your effort in practicing on them –actually doing the practice before looking at the answers—is very closely correlated with success on the graded assign-ments and the final examination.

The assignments are structured so that the due date is the last possible time you should complete them. I strongly urge you to complete the assignments well before the listed due date. If you leave them all until the due date they will be crowded to-gether at the end of the course, and you will be very busy at that time.

Updated: Aug 22, 2017

Philosophy Department • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-2273 Fax: 407-823-6658  • philosophy@ucf.edu