Philosophy Department

Anthony Crisafi

Anthony Crisafi, Ph.D.

I am currently a Ph.D. student at Friedrich-Schiller Universität Jena, in Jena, Germany, where I am working on my dissertation titled "Hegel’s Noesis: Intelligent Consciousness and Hegel’s Contribution to the Phenomenology of Cognitive Science, Critical Theory, and Digital Humanities."  I hold a first Ph.D. from the Texts and Technology program at the University of Central Florida.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Texts and Technology from University of Central Florida (2008)
  • M.A. in English from University of Central Florida (2001)
  • B.A. in Humanities from New College of Florida (1995)

Research Interests

My research includes digital humanities, phenomenology, extended and embodied cognition, and critical theory.  In my work I  argue that while much of the field of New Media Studies focuses on poststructural and postmodern discourses concerning media and technology, phenomenology, with its emphasis on the relationship between intentional consciousness and the actualized text, can contribute both to theory and to methodology for studying how digital media is more than merely a representation of materialist textual practices.  I specifically research the areas of digital and networked art, cultural contexts of digital humanities, the history of texts and technology, as well as their relationship to extended and embodied cognition.

Recent Research Activities

The purpose of my current research is to demonstrate how the writings of G.W.F. Hegel concerning consciousness, cognition, and intelligence can be applied to current research methods within phenomenology and the discourses of cognitive science, critical theory, and digital humanities. Specifically, Hegel’s dialectic applies to the concepts of embodied, extended, and intersubjective cognition.  First, I have decided to focus my attention to the specific aspects of Hegel’s understanding and definition of Mind, specifically as the cognitive structure that helps to regulate and to maintain the essence of Spirit.  I am extracting here from the overall discussion of Hegel’s Spirit the Mind itself as the organic substance that both creates and maintains consciousness, which is made of the complex synthesis of sensation and reason.  Spirit is the more generalized and wider social and cultural aspects of the Hegelian Dialectic, while Mind is grounded in the human drive to live through the body, both physically and psychologically, as an equal part of its larger cultural milieu.  Hegelian Dialectic, the noesis of which is grounded in abstracting from Subjective Mind the essential desires and reasons for the human organism to exist and to thrive in physical Objective Spirit, is first and foremost a recognition of how cognition itself is the central mechanism whose organic structure.  In my research I  argue that Hegel’s writings on consciousness, cognition, and their extension and embodiment through a dynamic and creative intelligence are the precursors to the 20th century phenomenology movements, from Husserl’s own derision of Hegel in his writings, to Sartre’s ontological description of existential space, and to Merleau-Ponty's use of Hegel to establish the psychology of mind.  Hegel’s writing in these areas prefigured the current interdisciplinary discourses and disciplines of phenomenology, critical theory, and cognitive science, especially in the situated and autopoetic consciousness that creates and maintains itself; the embodied, extended, and intersubjective creative cognitive structures; and the moment of intelligent consciousness actualizing itself in an absolute moment of what Hegel termed noesis  Hegel re-introduced the concept of noesis into western thought and into the science of knowing that phenomenology represents.  Hegel directly engages with the established Greek texts of his time of both Plato and Aristotle, and Hegel analyzes noesis in both of them by discussing Plato's own analysis of noesis in the Cratylus.  In his Lectures on the History of Philosophy (1840), Hegel analyzes Plato's contention that noesis is the ultimate dialectic which creates the "divine intelligence" [he theon noesis].  Plato does this in his unfolding of the myth of Athena birth.  Hegel then analyzes Athena as the dialectic of thought and creativity through the absorption of Metis by Zeus.  In order for something of Metis to live on, she creates out of her own matter, which is being consumed by Zeus, along with Zeus’ own brain to support the oogenotic creation of Athena.  But to think of this as a late idea in Hegel is not correct.  in hisPhilosophy of Mind: The Third Part of the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences in Outline (1817),  Hegel also quotes and analyzes the Greek text of Aristotle's Metaphyiscs where he mentions noesis specifically in connection with the prime mover who intelligently thinks.  Hegel analyzes Aristotle's concept of noesis as the "thinking consciousness" [noesis tes noeseos].  This demonstrates that Hegel came across the idea of noesis early on in his studies, and he was influenced to think of dialectic as what he would call the intelligent consciousness, his own reading of the Greek noesis.   I can demonstrate also in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit where Hegel argues for consciousness to be understood as intelligent consciousness.  Hegel recognizes the situated and embodied nature of consciousness as creating and producing rational intelligence through creative and critical thinking together at one moment of pure dialectic becoming of consciousness extended and embodied into existential space through noesis, the dynamic intelligence. And because contemporary phenomenology has re-discovered Hegel, Hegel’s own research into how the mind and body create, maintain, and produce this dynamic intelligence, we can use this to show how Hegel’s writings on consciousness, cognition, and intelligence have much to offer by way of current theoretical and research considerations in contemporary phenomenology, especially in the areas of cognitive science, critical theory, and digital humanities.

Selected Publications

Books

  • The Forces of Evil.  Ed. with Denise Crisafi.  Whitney: Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2011.  ISBN: 978-1-84888-039-9. 

Articles/Essays

  • “Hegel and the Extended Mind.”  AI & Soc (2010) 25:123–129.  (Co-authored with Shaun Gallagher).
  • Violence in Film:  Measuring Existential Reactions to Evil.” Co-suthored with Denise Crisafi.  Uneasy Humanity:  Perpetual Wrestling with Evils.  Colette Balmain and Nanette Norris, eds.  Inter-Disciplinary Press, Oxford, United Kingdom: 2009.  ISBN:  978-1-904710-92-9.
  • “Mental Institutions.” Topoi (2009) 28:45–51.  (Co-authored with Shaun Gallagher).

Book Sections/Chapters

  • The Seduction of Evil: An Examination of the Media Culture of the Curret White Supremacist Movement.”  Something Wicked This Way Comes:  Essays on Evil and Human Wickedness.  Colette Balmain and Lois Drawmer, Eds. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2009.  ISBN: 978-90-420-2550-9

Awards

  1. Philipps-Universität Marburg STIBET Funded Teaching Assistantship, starting October 2013.
  2. Research Assistant: MRP University Research Initiative. Shared Mental Models/Embodied Cognition in Human-agent Teams.  Shaun Gallagher      and Steve Fiore, University of Central Florida, January 2008 to August 2008. 
  3. Teaching Fellowship: University of Central Florida, August 2000 to August 2001.
  4. Graduate Assistant: University of Central Florida Film Department, August 2000-May 2001.
  5. Graduate Fellowship Incentive, University of Central Florida, August 2002.
  6. Graduate Travel Fellowship, University of Central Florida, November 2000.
  7. Graduated Magna Cum Laude from Brevard Community College, May 1992.
  8. Dean’s List, Brevard Community College.
  9. Brevard Community College Award for Excellence in Communications, May 1992.
  10. German Language Studies Scholarship, Brevard Community College, January 1992.

Activities

Professional Service

  • Reader, AP Examination in English Literature, ETS Board, Daytona Beach, Florida, 2001 - 2003.
  • Reviewer (invited), Choices, an English Handbook for Prentice Hall/Pearson Education.
  • Reviewer (invited), chapter five of Laurie Schneider Adam’s Exploring the Humanities (Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall, 2006).

Academic Memberships

  • Modern Language Association
  • Inter-Disciplinary.net Hub Leader
  • National Council of Teachers of English
  • Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
  • National Education Association
  • Florida College English Association (FCEA)
  • Florida Association of Community Colleges (FACC)

Language Skills

  • Ancient Greek – Reading/Writing Knowledge
  • Latin – Reading/Writing Knowledge
  • German – Speaking/Reading/Writing Knowledge
  • Italian - Speaking/Reading Knowledge

Courses

No courses found for Spring 2018.

No courses found for Fall 2017.

No courses found for Summer 2017.

No courses found for Spring 2017.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
80453 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Face2Face Tu,Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM Available
Humanistic Tradition I is an interdisciplinary, multicultural study of the arts and sciences contributed by diverse human traditions to world civilization. Focus is on Ancient civilizations up to the Renaissance. Note that HUM 2210 is a Gordon Rule course. The “Gordon Rule” (State Rule 6A-10.30) applies to students who first enrolled in any college or university after October 1982. The rule requires students to complete four courses (twelve credit hours) of writing and to complete two courses (six credit hours) of mathematics at the level of college algebra or higher. Each course must be completed with a minimum grade of “C." HUM 2210 is categorized as a Gordon Rule course.
81311 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Face2Face Tu 6:00PM - 8:50PM Available
Humanistic Tradition I is an interdisciplinary, multicultural study of the arts and sciences contributed by diverse human traditions to world civilization. Focus is on Ancient civilizations up to the Renaissance. Note that HUM 2210 is a Gordon Rule course. The “Gordon Rule” (State Rule 6A-10.30) applies to students who first enrolled in any college or university after October 1982. The rule requires students to complete four courses (twelve credit hours) of writing and to complete two courses (six credit hours) of mathematics at the level of college algebra or higher. Each course must be completed with a minimum grade of “C." HUM 2210 is categorized as a Gordon Rule course.
81514 HUM2230 Humanistic Tradition Ⅱ Web Web Available
Humanistic Tradition II is an interdisciplinary, multicultural study of the arts and sciences contributed by diverse human traditions to world civilization. Focus is on then Renaissance up to the Contemporary time.
92004 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Web Web Available
Introduction to Philosophy is a course where we inquire into the meaning and justification of fundamental ideas and beliefs concerning reality, knowledge, and values; application to relevant topics in ethics, religion, and politics.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
61358 HUM3435 Medieval Humanities Web A Web Available
An interdisciplinary, multicultural study of the development of medieval thought and culture with emphasis on philosophy, religion, literature and art.

Course Objectives

• Analyze and discuss meanings of artworks, performances, and texts in diverse aesthetic, historical and cultural contexts.
• Identify the cultural and historical influences on Western medieval thought through the reading of primary source material.
• Formulate a theory of the medieval worldview as represented in the arts, philosophy, literature, and religions of the time and culture.
• These objectives will be accomplished through readings, discussions, quizzes, and written assignments.
51083 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy Face2Face B M,Tu,W,Th 10:00AM - 11:50AM Available
Introduction to Philosophy is a course where we inquire into the meaning and justification of fundamental ideas and beliefs concerning reality, knowledge, and values; application to relevant topics in ethics, religion, and politics.

Updated: Aug 23, 2016

Philosophy Department • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-2273 Fax: 407-823-6658  • philosophy@ucf.edu