Philosophy Department

Mathew Mathew Jacob

Mathew Mathew Jacob, Ph.D.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Christology of Severus of Antioch from Catholic Theological Faculty, University of Salzburg, Austira (2001)
  • M.A. in Christian Theology from Catholic Theological Faculty, University of Salzburg, Austira (1998)
  • B.A. in Christian Theology from Board of Theological Education, Senate of Serampore College, IND (1994)
  • B.A. in Physics from Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam, India (1990)

Research Interests

  • Christian Theology
  • Orthodox Theology
  • Severus of Antioch
  • Patristics
  • World Religions
  • Humanities
  • Baroque Paintings
  • Writings of Paulose Mar Gregorios
  • Early Christian Mysticism

Recent Research Activities

  • Caravaggio: Conversion of St. Paul

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10719 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
11333 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81385 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
No Description Available
81475 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Not Online
No Description Available

No courses found for Summer 2018.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
10756 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Available

This is a three credit hour interdisciplinary study on arts and sciences stemming from diverse cultural and historical contexts. Humanities also attempt to gather contributions from various human traditions to the world civilization. It begins from prehistoric and ancient civilizations, moves on to Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, and reaches the World Beyond. Art, literature, music, philosophy, religion and architecture are the avenues here to focus on. The student is advised to always refer back to primary sources (translated from original languages mostly) if at hand, for instance, like ‘the Code of Hammurabi’ or the ‘African Creation Myths’.

11457 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Available

This is a three credit hour interdisciplinary study on arts and sciences stemming from diverse cultural and historical contexts. Humanities also attempt to gather contributions from various human traditions to the world civilization. It begins from prehistoric and ancient civilizations, moves on to Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, and reaches the World Beyond. Art, literature, music, philosophy, religion and architecture are the avenues here to focus on. The student is advised to always refer back to primary sources (translated from original languages mostly) if at hand, for instance, like ‘the Code of Hammurabi’ or the ‘African Creation Myths’.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81671 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Available

This is a three credit hour interdisciplinary study on arts and sciences stemming from diverse cultural and historical contexts. Humanities also attempt to gather contributions from various human traditions to the world civilization. It begins from prehistoric and ancient civilizations, moves on to Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, and reaches the World Beyond. Art, literature, music, philosophy, religion and architecture are the avenues here to focus on. The student is advised to always refer back to primary sources (translated from original languages mostly) if at hand, for instance, like ‘the Code of Hammurabi’ or the ‘African Creation Myths’.

81917 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web Web Available

This is a three credit hour interdisciplinary study on arts and sciences stemming from diverse cultural and historical contexts. Humanities also attempt to gather contributions from various human traditions to the world civilization. It begins from prehistoric and ancient civilizations, moves on to Medieval Europe, the Renaissance, and reaches the World Beyond. Art, literature, music, philosophy, religion and architecture are the avenues here to focus on. The student is advised to always refer back to primary sources (translated from original languages mostly) if at hand, for instance, like ‘the Code of Hammurabi’ or the ‘African Creation Myths’.

Updated: Jan 7, 2018

Philosophy Department • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-2273 Fax: 407-823-6658  • philosophy@ucf.edu