Shelley M Park

Shelley M Park, Ph.D.

Biography

Trained in analytic philosophy, but an interdisciplinary scholar at heart, Dr. Park teaches in both the Philosophy program and the Humanities and Cultural Studies Program. She is also a member of the Texts and Technologies graduate faculty and a faculty affiliate of the Women's and Gender Studies program.

Dr. Park's research and teaching interests include Feminist Theory, Queer Theory, Postcolonial Theory, Cultural Studies and Motherhood Studies, with an emphasis on queer kinship and, more recently, technologically mediated forms of care. Courses she regularly teaches include Family Values, Feminist Theory, Theories of Sex and Gender in the Humanities, Philosophy of Love, Postcolonial Theory and Introduction to Philosophy.

Administratively, Dr. Park has served as Director of the Women's Studies Program (1997-2000) and Chair of the Department of Philosophy (2000-2003). She has also served on numerous university, college, and department committees, is a certified diversity trainer, queer faculty ally and past President of the United Faculty of Florida-UCF.  Professional service includes being President of the Florida Philosophical Association (2004) , founding co-Editor of the Florida Philosophical Review (2000-2003) and founding associate Editor of Queer Studies in Media and Popular Culture (2015-present). She has also served on the Steering committees, Program Committees, Diversity Committees and Awards Committees of several regional and national professional organizations of which she is a member.

Education

  • Ph.D. in Philosophy from Duke University (1990)
  • M.A. in Philosophy from University of Calgary (1984)
  • B.A. in Philosophy from University of Calgary (1982)

Research Interests

Kinship studies, ethics of care, philosophy of love, queer theory, feminist theory, postcolonial theory, media and technology studies, cultural studies

Recent Research Activities

I am currently working on a monograph on the ethics of care in a technological era.  Related projects include work in progress on the gendering of surveillance technologies, the haunting of social robotics by the colonial past, and the ways in which technologies of care both address and perpetuate precarity. 


Selected Publications

Books

Edited Collections

  • Ranjoo S. Herr and Shelley M. Park, eds., Contested Terrains: Women of Color, Third World Women, Feminisms and Geopolitics.  Special Issue of Hypatia Vol 32: 3 (Summer 2017).

Articles/Essays

Book Sections/Chapters

  • Forthcoming Shelley M. Park, "From Queer Mothers to Querying Mothering," Routledge Motherhood Companion, eds. Lynn O'Brien Hallstein, Andrea O'Reilly, and Melinda Vandenbeld Giles(Routledge, 2019)
  • Forthcoming Shelley M. Park and Dakota Park-Ozee, "Gendered Divisions of Labor in the 21st Century Academy," International Handbook of Gender Equity in Higher Education, eds. Nancy Niemi and Marcus Weaver-Hightower (Wiley-Blackwell).
  • Shelley M. Park, Cyborg mothering.  In Jocelyn Stitt and Pegeen Powell, eds. Mothers who deliver: Feminist interventions in interpersonal and public discourse (New York: SUNY Press, 2010) 57-75.

  • Shelley M. Park, Is queer parenting possible? In Rachel Epstein, ed.  Who's your daddy? And other writings on queer parenting (Toronto: Sumach Press, 2009) 316-327.

  • Shelley M. Park, Feminist therapies.  In Charles Negy, ed. Cross-cultural psychotherapy: Toward a critical understanding of diverse clients. 2nd. ed. (Reno, NV: Bent Tree Press, 2008) 351-378. 

Book Reviews

Conference Papers/Presentations

  • Forthcoming Shelley M. Park, "Technologies of Care, Technologies of Precarity," Care Ethics Research Consortium, Portland, OR, Sept 2018
  • Shelley M. Park,  "When Feminism and Queerness Collide: Reflections on the #metoo Movement," Keynote Address to the University of Florida Undergraduate Philosophy Conference.  Gainesville, FL, April 2018.
  • Shelley M. Park, “Re-Thinking the Uncanny Valley from a Feminist, Decolonial Perspective,” Florida Philosophical Association, Ocala, FL, November 2017.  
  • Shelley M. Park, Unsettling Feminist Philosophy: An Encounter with Tracey Moffat's Night Cries, Feminist Ethics and Social Theory conference.  Clearwater, FL, October 2017.
  • Shelley M. Park, Helicopter Moms and Smart Homes: Fears of the (M)other in the Surveillance State. PhiloSOPHIA, Boca Raton, FL. April 2017. 

  • Shelley M. Park, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood, Keynote address to University of South Carolina—Upstate, Bodies of Knowledge Symposium. March 2016.  

  • Shelley M. Park, FLDS Mothers as Subaltern Subjects. University of Calgary, Department of Philosophy 50th Anniversary Lecture Series, Calgary, Alberta. January 2016. 

  • Shelley M. Park, Polyamory is to Polygamy as Queer is to Barbaric? Queer Kinship and Relationship Conference.  Zalesie Mazury, Poland. June 2015.

  • Shelley M. Park, When Feminism and Queerness Collide: The Case of Jian Ghomeshi. Popular Culture Association.  New Orleans, LA.  April 2015.

  • Shelley M. Park, Cyborg Mothering:  The Ethics of Care in a Technological Era. Florida Philosophical Association.  Tampa, FL.  November 2014.

  • Shelley M. Park, The Diversity Problem in Philosophy. Florida Philosophical Association. Deland, FL. November 2013.

  • Shelley M. Park, "Good” (Queer) Mothers and “Bad” (Queer) Mothers:  Contested Representations of Polygamist Women in Popular Culture.  Plenary Address to Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement. Toronto, ON, June 2013.  Also presented to the Cultural Studies Association. Chicago, IL, May 2013.

  • Shelley M. Park, One and Only One Mother?  Resisting Monomaternalism.  Florida Philosophical Association.  November 2012.

  • Shelley M. Park, Where are All the Cyborg Mothers?  Reflections on the Posthuman Maternal Body.  Canadian Society for Women in Philosophy.  Calgary, AB, October 2012.

  • Shelley M. Park, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood: An Exploration of Polymaternal Families.  Society for Women in Philosophy, Eastern Division.  Washington, D.C. December 2011.

  • Monomaternalism and the Politics of Mothering in Adoptive, Queer, and Blended Families. Association for Feminist Ethics and Social Theory.  Illinois.  September 2011.

  • Shelley M. Park, Queer Family Values in Showtime’s The United States of Tara. Popular Culture Association. San Antonio, TX. March 2010. 

  • Shelley M. Park, Nomadic Musings. Keynote address for Queer Week.  New College.  Sarasota, FL, 2009.

  • Shelley M. Park, Queer Family Values in HBO’s Big Love. Popular Culture Association. New Orleans, LA. March 2009.
  • Shelley M. Park, (Inter)Disciplinary Homes, Queer Orientations. Breaking Boundaries, Forging Connections conference.  Halifax, NS.  April 2008.

Miscellaneous Publications

Awards

  • UCF Research Incentive Award, 2018
  • UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award, 2017
  • UCF Research Sabbatical (competitive), 2017
  • UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award, 2012
  • UCF Research Sabbatical (competitive), 2010
  • UCF Women’s Research Center Award, 2009
  • UCF Teaching Incentive Program Award, 2007

Activities

  • Associate Editor and Reviews Editor for Queer Studies in Media and Popular Culture 
  • Diversity Committee, Florida Philosophical Association
  • CAH Tenure and Promotion Committee
  • UCF Texts and Technologies Research Awards Committee
  • UCF Humanities and Cultural Studies Curriculum Committee
  • UCF Humanities and Cultural Studies Faculty Search Committee

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11490 HUM4826 Postcolonial Theory Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 03:00 PM - 04:15 PM Unavailable

This course serves as an interdisciplinary overview of postcolonial philosophy, literature, film, art and cultural theory. It provides a historical overview of colonial and postcolonial discourses, with particular attention to the critical vocabulary that has emerged in the last half-century to describe both colonial practices and postcolonial experiences and strategies of resistance. We will interrogate how the struggle against Western colonization leads to a critique of Western thought and culture, with a focus on questions (and place) of identity, history, nation, race and gender and an emphasis on how the past shapes the present.

11279 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy World Wide Web (W) Unavailable

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). We will explore the various theories of the good life, asking about the relationship between living well and personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. Throughout we will examine these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

11280 PHM3123 Feminist Theories Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Unavailable

This course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of recent and contemporary movements for women’s liberation and how both the notion of “women” and the notion of “liberation” has changed in recent decades.  The theoretical perspectives to be examined (some more carefully than others) include:  liberal feminism, radical feminism, care feminism, Marxist feminism, multicultural feminism, global and postcolonial feminism, third wave and postmodern feminism, ecofeminism, crip theory, and queer theory.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81445 HUM3326 Theories Sex & Gender in Hum Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of contemporary theories concerning sex and gender. Theories to be examined include post-structuralist theories of gender, feminist theories of sex and gender, biological theories of nature and nurture, developmental systems theories of sex and sexuality, critical race theories concerning the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality, and phenomenological theories of the lived experiences of sexual and other orientations. We will examine these and other theories in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

81379 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy World Wide Web (W) Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

81502 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy World Wide Web (W) Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). Students should be prepared to think about the relationship between living well and access to personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. We will explore these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
50855 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy World Wide Web (W) A Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). We will explore the various theories of the good life, asking about the relationship between living well and personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. Throughout we will examine these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
18861 HUM4826 Postcolonial Theory Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 03:00 PM - 04:15 PM Available

This course serves as an interdisciplinary overview of postcolonial philosophy, literature, film, art and cultural theory. It provides a historical overview of colonial and postcolonial discourses, with particular attention to the critical vocabulary that has emerged in the last half-century to describe both colonial practices and postcolonial experiences and strategies of resistance. We will interrogate how the struggle against Western colonization leads to a critique of Western thought and culture, with a focus on questions (and place) of identity, history, nation, race and gender and an emphasis on how the past shapes the present.

11374 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy World Wide Web (W) 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). We will explore the various theories of the good life, asking about the relationship between living well and personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. Throughout we will examine these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

11375 PHM3123 Feminist Theories Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Available

This course focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of recent and contemporary movements for women’s liberation and how both the notion of “women” and the notion of “liberation” has changed in recent decades.  The theoretical perspectives to be examined (some more carefully than others) include:  liberal feminism, radical feminism, care feminism, Marxist feminism, multicultural feminism, global and postcolonial feminism, third wave and postmodern feminism, ecofeminism, crip theory, and queer theory.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
81630 HUM3326 Theories Sex & Gender in Hum Face to Face Instruction (P) Tu,Th 10:30 AM - 11:45 AM Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of contemporary theories concerning sex and gender. Theories to be examined include post-structuralist theories of gender, feminist theories of sex and gender, biological theories of nature and nurture, developmental systems theories of sex and sexuality, critical race theories concerning the intersections of race, class, gender and sexuality, and phenomenological theories of the lived experiences of sexual and other orientations. We will examine these and other theories in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

81534 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy World Wide Web (W) 12:00 AM - 12:00 AM Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). We will explore the various theories of the good life, asking about the relationship between living well and personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. Throughout we will examine these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

93168 PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy World Wide Web (W) Available

In this course, we will examine a variety of philosophical concepts and themes, focusing on the nature of the good life (a classical philosophical concern). We will explore the various theories of the good life, asking about the relationship between living well and personal and public goods such as health, wealth, pleasure, knowledge, truth, justice, beauty and virtue. Throughout we will examine these issues in light of their interplay with popular culture and everyday life.

Updated: Dec 6, 2018