Philosophy Department

Nicholas Shrubsole

Nicholas Shrubsole, Ph.D.

Nick Shrubsole joined the University of Central Florida in Fall 2015. Prior to arriving in Florida, Dr. Shrubsole was a Lecturer in Religious Studies at St. Jerome's University in the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. He also has teaching experience in social justice and peace programs.

Dr. Shrubsole research positions him as an ally to Indigenous Peoples. He works closely on matters of Indigenous religious freedom and Indigenous Rights in Canada.  You will be hard-pressed to find a course that Dr. Shrubsole teaches without a component dedicated to the subject of colonialism and its continuing impact on Turtle Island. 

Dr. Shrubsole identifies as a disabled person. In the past few years he has been working with the American Academy of Religion's committee on the status of  persons with disabilities in the profession to make academia a more inclusive and welcoming space for scholars with disabilities. 

Education

  • Ph.D. in Religious Studies from University of Waterloo (2013)
  • M.A. in Religion and Culture from Wilfrid Laurier University (2006)
  • B.A. in History from Wilfrid Laurier University (2005)

Research Interests

  • The rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • Contemporary Indigenous Religious Traditions and Philosophy
  • Religious Freedom
  • Religion and the law
  • Religion and politics
  • Religion in Canada
  • Secularization

Recent Research Activities

Currently, Shrubsole is working on a book project titled The Search for Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada. The book explores how the definition, location, and conditions of religion offered in the colonial state of Canada continue to impede the survival and development of indigenous religions today. The book explores various means of redress, including the Canadian Constitution (domestic legal redress), modern democratic processes of engagement (domestic political forms of redress), and the viability of international mechanisms such as the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (international redress) in the pursuit of a more just state. 

Selected Publications

Articles/Essays

  • Shrubsole, N. The Impossibility of Indigenous Religious Freedom. Policy Options (Institute for Research on Public Policy, 13 Nov 2017), http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/november-2017/the-impossibility-of-indigenous-religious-free...
  • Shrubsole, Nicholas. Secularization, Dispossession, and Forced Deprivatization: The Conditions of Public Religion and the Protection of First Nations’ Sacred Space. Studies in Religion/Sciences Religieuses. 45(3) 2016: 335 –359. (PR)

  • Shrubsole, Nicholas. Denying and Limiting Religious Freedom: Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia, 2015. The Ecumenist 52(4), 15.
  • Shrubsole, Nicholas. The Decision in Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia, 2014: Theology in the Courts and Indigenous Religious Freedom. The Ecumenist 51(4) 2014: 8–13.

  • Shrubsole, Nicholas. The Sun Dance and the Gustafsen Lake Standoff: Healing Through Resistance and the Danger of Dismissing Religion. International Indigenous Policy Journal 2(4), October 2011. 

Book Sections/Chapters

  • Shrubsole, Nicholas and P. Whitney Lackenbauer. The Gustafsen Lake Standoff. In Blockades or Breakthroughs? Aboriginal Peoples Confront the Canadian State, 1970-2007, eds., Yale Belanger and P. Whitney Lackenbauer. Montreal-Kingston: McGill-Queens University Press, 314–355.

Book Reviews

  • Tom Bailey and Valentina Gentile, eds. Rawls and Religion (New York: Columbia University Press, 2014). Journal of Church and State  58(3) 2016: 560-562.

Conference Papers/Presentations

  • Shrubsole, N. Incommensurability and the Challenge for Indigenous Religious Freedom Claims. American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting. Boston, MA, November 2017.

  • Shrubsole, N. "Setting Precedent on Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada: The Ktunaxa Nation Supreme Court Decision." Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Vancouver, British Columbia, June 2017.
  • Shrubsole, N. "Skiing in the Presence of the Kachina and Kⱡawⱡa Tukⱡuⱡakʔis: A Comparative Assessment of the Treatment of Navajo-Hopi and Ktunaxa Religious Freedom Claims." Canadian Society for the Study of Religion Annual Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, May 2017.
  • Panelist. Precarious Lives: Economy, Identity, and Luck in Contemporary Academia. American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting. San Antonio, TX, November 2016.
  • Shrubsole, N. The End of Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada? The Ktunaxa Nation Defeat in the British Columbia Court of Appeals (2015). Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Honolulu, HI, May 2016.

  • Shrubsole, N. Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia, 2014: Theological Exclusivity and Indigenous Religious Freedom. Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, June 2015.

  • Shrubsole, N. ‘Religions Plus:’ Constitutional Contradictions and an Argument for the Special Protection of Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada. American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting. San Diego, CA, November 2014.

  • Shrubsole, N. and K. Green. “Please Resist, It May Be All There Is”: The Secularization Debate in the Punk Rock Subculture. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences/Canadian Society for the Study of Religion, St. Catherine’s, ON, June 2014.

  • Shrubsole, N. Religion, Recognition and Consultation in Kelly Lake Cree Nation v. British Columbia. Indigenous Studies Summer Program Participants’ Panel, Columbia University, June 2014.

  • Shrubsole, N. First Nations Sacred Sites and Section 2(a): Cases from British Columbia and the Challenge of Natural Physical Space for Religious Freedom in a Liberal Democratic Canada. Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences/Canadian Society for the Study of Religion, Victoria, BC, June 2013.

  • Shrubsole, N. Sacred Sites and Religious Rights: Indigenous Religious Freedom and Sacred Sites in the Secular Canadian State. Public Presentation, St. Paul’s University College in the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, March 2013

  • Shrubsole, N. Property, Religion, and the Legal Relationship between Indigenous Peoples and the Canadian State: Historical Roots and Contemporary Issues, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, November 2011.

  • Shrubsole, N. The Sun Dance and Violent Resistance: Healing through Political Action at Gustafsen Lake and Wounded Knee, Religion and Public Life Conference, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, February 2011.

  • Shrubsole, N. Mining for Nickel in Sacred Space: the Innu and Voisey’s Bay, Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences/Canadian Society for the Study of Religion, Montreal, PQ, June 2010.

  • Shrubsole, N. Panellist for ‘Aboriginal Peoples, Religion, and Public Dialogue in Canada,’ American Academy of Religion Eastern International Regional Meeting, Ottawa, ON, May 2010

  • Shrubsole, N. The Limits of the Deliberative Democratic Process: Negotiating First Nations’ Sacred Space, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, Montreal PQ, November 2009.

  • Shrubsole, N. Forced “Deprivatization” and the Public Conditions of Religion: First Nations Sacred Sites in Canada’s Courts, American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting, Montreal PQ, November 2009

Miscellaneous Publications

  • Shrubsole, N. Reflection, Agency and Active Learning. In Faculty Focus 15(1) 2016: 8-9.
  • Seljak, David, Joanne Benham Rennick, and Nicholas Shrubsole. Christianity and Citizenship. In Religion and Citizenship in Canada: Issues, Challenges, and Opportunitiesed. Paul Bramadat, 14-54. Report prepared for Citizenship and Immigration Canada by the Centre for Studies in Religion and Society, University of Victoria. Submitted March 2011.

Activities

In the Academy

  • Committee Member, Status of Persons With Disabilities in the Profession at the American Academy of Religion
  • Steering Committee, Law, Religion and Culture Group at the American Academy of Religion

Activities in Teaching and Learning

  • Diversity Track, Faculty Development Conference, Summer 2017
  • Faculty Fellow, Writing Across the Curriculum, Spring 2017
  • Engaged Learning, Faculty Development Cohort, Spring 2017
  • Presenter, Faculty Development Conference, Winter 2016
  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, Faculty Development Cohort, SFall 2016
  • Diversity Track, Faculty Development Conference, Summer 2016
  • Active Learning, Course Innovation Project Cohort, Spring 2016
  • Participant, IDL6543, Online Teaching Instruction and Development, Spring 2016
  • Presenter, Faculty Development Conference, Winter 2016

Courses

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
11523 HUM2020 Encountering the Humanities Web Web Available

This course is an introduction to humanities ideas, research methods, and approaches to scholarship and creative work. Students will be introduced to diverse tools and approaches for critically examining intellectual, cultural, and creative human expression. 

More specifically, this course asks students to investigate several theoretical approaches to the Humanities that may include postcolonial theory, feminist theory, queer theory, and critical race theory. We will use these theoretical frameworks to understand the significance of some creative works and to offer critiques of others. This course is unapologetically an exploration of contemporary Humanities and the work of marginalized, ignored, and excluded communities.

10406 HUM4933 Senior Research Seminar Face2Face Tu 6:00PM - 8:50PM Not Online

This course is the Capstone Course for Humanities Majors. As such, it serves as a culmination of the Humanities undergraduate program, and it enables students to draw on methods, skills and concepts from their entire undergraduate career. The course is structured as a seminar, i.e. it is intended to be participatory. Students will be expected to lead discussions on texts and topics in the course. The seminar requirements also include a research paper that will be proposed, drafted, reviewed, and revised throughout the semester. In addition, this course focuses on professional development with attention to reflection on the skills and tools each student has learned, developed, and honed during their undergraduate career. 

11272 REL2300 World Religions Web Web Available

This course examines the basic features and historical backgrounds of a variety of religious traditions (such as Buddhism and Islam) and collections of religious traditions (such as indigenous religions and new religious movements) with a particular emphasis on the local and the global in the modern world. For this reason, we will step beyond the traditional parameters of studying religions in isolation from each other to explore the intersections of mobile, transnational, publicly-engaged religions today. Additional subjects of discussion include religion and politics, religion and violence, religion and gender, and secularization.

Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
80629 HUM2020 Encountering the Humanities Rdce Time M,W 12:30PM - 1:20PM Available

This course is an introduction to humanities ideas, research methods, and approaches to scholarship and creative work. Students will be introduced to diverse tools and approaches for critically examining intellectual, cultural, and creative human expression. 

More specifically, this course asks students to investigate several theoretical approaches to the Humanities that may include postcolonial theory, feminist theory, queer theory, and critical race theory. We will use these theoretical frameworks to understand the significance of some creative works and to offer critiques of others. This course is unapologetically an exploration of contemporary Humanities and the work of marginalized, ignored, and excluded communities.

81698 HUM2020 Encountering the Humanities Rdce Time M,W 10:30AM - 11:20AM Available

This course is an introduction to humanities ideas, research methods, and approaches to scholarship and creative work. Students will be introduced to diverse tools and approaches for critically examining intellectual, cultural, and creative human expression. 

More specifically, this course asks students to investigate several theoretical approaches to the Humanities that may include postcolonial theory, feminist theory, queer theory, and critical race theory. We will use these theoretical frameworks to understand the significance of some creative works and to offer critiques of others. This course is unapologetically an exploration of contemporary Humanities and the work of marginalized, ignored, and excluded communities.

81442 REL2000 Intro to Rel and Cult St Web Web Available

This course acts as an introduction primarily to Religious Studies with attention given to CUltural Studies and an emphasis on the intersections of Religion and Popular Culture. We are not so much concerned with the subject of Religious Studies, but rather the field. The "field" refers to the history, methods, and principal ideas in the activity of studying what has come to be called "religion." Together we will answer several critical questions in the subject-field of Religious Studies including the following: What is Religion? HOw do we study religion? What is the relationship between religion and culture? What are the challenges of studying religion and culture?

80471 REL2300 World Religions Web Web Available

This course examines the basic features and historical backgrounds of a variety of religious traditions (such as Buddhism and Islam) and collections of religious traditions (such as indigenous religions and new religious movements) with a particular emphasis on the local and the global in the modern world. For this reason, we will step beyond the traditional parameters of studying religions in isolation from each other to explore the intersections of mobile, transnational, publicly-engaged religions today. Additional subjects of discussion include religion and politics, religion and violence, religion and gender, and secularization.

Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
51151 HUM2020 Encountering the Humanities Web B Web Available
This course is an introduction to humanities ideas, research methods, and approaches to scholarship and creative work. Students will be introduced to diverse tools and approaches for critically examining intellectual, cultural, and creative human expression.

More specifically, this course asks students to investigate several theoretical approaches to the Humanities that may include postcolonial theory, feminist theory, queer theory, and critical race theory. We will use these theoretical frameworks to understand the significance of some creative works and to offer critiques of others. This course is unapologetically an exploration of contemporary Humanities and the work of marginalized, ignored, and excluded communities.
51107 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web A Web Available
This course provides an interdisciplinary and multicultural study of the arts and sciences that contributed from diverse human traditions to world civilization. Our focus in this first half of the Humanistic Traditions sequence is on ancient civilizations and the cultural heritage stemming from them. This course begins in the prehistoric periods and concludes with the European Renaissance.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
19832 HUM2020 Encountering the Humanities Face2Face Tu,Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM Available
This course is an introduction to humanities ideas, research methods, and approaches to scholarship and creative work. Students will be introduced to diverse tools and approaches for critically examining intellectual, cultural, and creative human expression. While we will discuss diverse subjects over the semester, there is a common unifying theme: “Responding to the Dominant.” Together, we will encounter Native American literature and film, the street art of such artists as Keith Haring, and subcultural protest music in the genres of punk and hip hop. Through an interdisciplinary approach, we will explore how these expressions embody responses to colonialism, racism, economic disparities, oppression and discrimination, not only through words, but images, sounds, and the very act and physical locations of expression.
18537 PHH3701 Native American Philosophy Face2Face Tu,Th 3:00PM - 4:15PM Available
This course explores contemporary Indigenous (Native American) philosophies. First and foremost, we must remember that “Native American” and the broader term “indigenous” are umbrella terms used to categorize diverse nations. While each indigenous thinker explored in this course may express similar ideas, it is important to highlight the unique traditions and contexts from within which each writer teaches. We should not mistake common ground for a homogenized singular philosophical approach.

Until indigenous peoples secured access to the academy as part of their ongoing pursuit of self-determination and self-development, settler societies viewed indigenous peoples as a historically-locatable singularity in need of transitional support into superior Euro-American epistemological frameworks. Indigenous peoples have always possessed their own ways of knowing, but the rest of the world largely turned a deaf ear. This course provides an opportunity to listen.

Following a broader introduction to the subject of Native American philosophy in McPherson and Rabb’s Indian from the Inside, we will explore some of the most critical thinkers in Native American philosophy. Apache scholar Viola Cordova was the first indigenous woman to receive a doctoral degree in Philosophy. Sioux scholar Vine Deloria Jr. is largely renowned as one of the most influential writers in Native American thought. Mohawk scholar Taiaiake Alfred, living in a country he does not recognize, may be one of the most impactful and influential indigenous philosophers today. Finally, Anishinaabe scholar Winona LaDuke is a well-known indigenous activist on the environment and recovery of tribal lands, among other causes.
11341 REL2300 World Religions Web Web Available
This course examines the basic features and historical backgrounds of a variety of religious traditions (such as Buddhism and Islam) and collections of religious traditions (such as indigenous religions and new religious movements) with a particular emphasis on the local and the global in the modern world. For this reason, we will step beyond the traditional parameters of studying religions in isolation from each other to explore the intersections of mobile, transnational, publicly-engaged religions today. Additional subjects of discussion include religion and politics, religion and violence, religion and gender, and secularization.
Course Number Course Title Mode Date and Time Syllabus
92519 HUM2020 Encountering the Humanities Face2Face Tu,Th 12:00PM - 1:15PM Available
This course is an introduction to humanities ideas, research methods, and approaches to scholarship and creative work. Students will be introduced to diverse tools and approaches for critically examining intellectual, cultural, and creative human expression. While we will discuss diverse subjects over the semester, there is a common unifying theme: “Responding to the Dominant.” Together, we will encounter Native American literature and film, the street art of such artists as Keith Haring, and subcultural protest music in the genres of punk and hip hop. Through an interdisciplinary approach, we will explore how these expressions embody responses to colonialism, racism, economic disparities, oppression and discrimination, not only through words, but images, sounds, and the very act and physical locations of expression.
80136 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Face2Face Tu,Th 10:30AM - 11:45AM Available
This course provides an interdisciplinary and multicultural study of the arts and sciences that contributed from diverse human traditions to world civilization. Our focus in this first half of the Humanistic Traditions sequence is on ancient civilizations and the cultural heritage stemming from them. This course begins in the prehistoric periods and concludes with the European Renaissance.
80483 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Face2Face Tu,Th 4:30PM - 5:45PM Available
This course provides an interdisciplinary and multicultural study of the arts and sciences that contributed from diverse human traditions to world civilization. Our focus in this first half of the Humanistic Traditions sequence is on ancient civilizations and the cultural heritage stemming from them. This course begins in the prehistoric periods and concludes with the European Renaissance.
80479 REL2300 World Religions Web Web Available
This course examines the basic features and historical backgrounds of a variety of religious traditions (such as Buddhism and Islam) and collections of religious traditions (such as indigenous religions and new religious movements) with a particular emphasis on the local and the global in the modern world. For this reason, we will step beyond the traditional parameters of studying religions in isolation from each other to explore the intersections of mobile, transnational, publicly-engaged religions today. Additional subjects of discussion include religion and politics, religion and violence, religion and gender, and secularization.
Course Number Course Title Mode Session Date and Time Syllabus
51041 HUM2020 Encountering the Humanities Face2Face B M,Tu,W,Th 12:00PM - 1:50PM Available
This course is an introduction to humanities ideas, research methods, and approaches to scholarship and creative work. Students will be introduced to diverse tools and approaches for critically examining intellectual, cultural, and creative human expression. While we will discuss diverse subjects over the semester, there is a common unifying theme: “Responding to the Dominant.” Together, we will encounter Native American literature and film, the street art of such artists as Keith Haring, and subcultural protest music in the genres of punk and hip hop. Through an interdisciplinary approach, we will explore how these expressions embody responses to colonialism, racism, economic disparities, oppression and discrimination, not only through words, but images, sounds, and the very act and physical locations of expression.
50978 HUM2210 Humanistic Tradition Ⅰ Web A Web Available
This course provides an interdisciplinary and multicultural study of the arts and sciences that contributed from diverse human traditions to world civilization. Our focus in this first half of the Humanistic Traditions sequence is on ancient civilizations and the cultural heritage stemming from them. This course begins in the prehistoric periods and concludes with the European Renaissance.

Updated: Dec 16, 2017

Philosophy Department • College of Arts & Humanities at the University of Central Florida
Phone: 407-823-2273 Fax: 407-823-6658  • philosophy@ucf.edu